Dental Bonding Vs Composite Veneers Pros and Cost

Dental Bonding Vs Composite Veneers: Benefits and Cost

Not everybody is a prospect for bleaching. Bleaching is not recommended if you have tooth-colored fillings, crowns, caps or bonding in your front teeth– the bleach will not alter the color of these materials, making them stand apart in your newly bleached smile. In these cases, you may wish to examine other choices, like veneers or bonding.

Benefits and Cost of Composite Veneers

Veneers are thin pieces of porcelain or plastic glued to the front of your teeth. For teeth that are significantly tarnished, chipped or misshapen, they develop a durable and pleasing smile. Veneers are challenging to stain, making them popular for individuals seeking a best smile.

There are two types of veneers:

  • Porcelain (indirect) veneers, which must first be created to fit your teeth in a dental laboratory and need two visits to the dental practitioner. Porcelain veneers cost in between $900-$ 2,500 per tooth and last from 10 to 15 years or more
  • Composite (direct) veneers, in which enamel is bonded to your tooth in a single see. Composite veneers cost substantially less, around $250 per tooth, however only last 5 to 7 years

Benefits and Cost of Dental Bonding

Bonding uses composite resin to restore chipped or broken teeth, fill in gaps and reshape or recolor your smile. After using an extremely moderate etching option that slightly roughs the surface of your teeth and allows the bonding product to adhere, your dental professional applies the resin and sculpts, colors and shapes it to supply a pleasing outcome. A high-intensity light hardens the material, which is then finely polished.

  • Many people choose bonding over silver fillings because it looks more natural– the material can be matched to your natural tooth color
  • The downsides of bonding versus silver fillings are that they cost more (from $300-$ 600 per tooth), and because it is permeable, cigarette smokers will find that it yellows

Your dental practitioner can tell you if you are a great candidate for veneers or bonding.

Dental Bonding Vs Veneers for More Natural Looking Teeth?

Q: Can anybody inform me if they have cosmetic bonding, not veneers? How is it? I just recently had my teeth prepped for Veneers and now I do not want them. I think they are too fake-looking.

In general, I do have good dental hygiene, do not smoke. Plus, I do not drink coffee as I heard these 2 practices stain bonding.

I have actually heard good ideas and bad things about both. I ‘d rather do touch ups and fix a chip rather than renovating veneers and have them appear fake as they did when my dental practitioner tried to seal them into my teeth. I chose not to get them so I had her re-temp my teeth.

A: If you’ve already had your teeth prepared (drilled to proper shape) for porcelain veneers, then you would be best off finishing the porcelain veneer procedure. In basic, porcelain veneers look much better than composite bonding. The 3 benefits of composite bonding is that less tooth needs to be prepared (drilled on), can frequently be done in only one visit, and lower cost than porcelain veneers that require a laboratory charge for the ceramist to make the porcelain veneers.

If you didn’t like the veneers that your dental expert tried onto your teeth, then your did the right thing by declining them at the try in stage. It is better to return the temporary veneers and have the laboratory redo them than to bond them into place then later on have to drill them off to redo them.

Communicate accurately about what you don’t like about the method the porcelain veneers were done so that the ceramist can make the proper modifications. Ask your dentist if he/she used a dedicated cosmetic dentistry laboratory, or a regular dental lab that does most everything. Believe it or not, some labs do better cosmetic work than others. Things to go over with your dental expert are the length, shape, color, surface texture, incisal clarity and balance and percentage of all the veneers.